• The Juice of the Poppy In the mid-nineteenth century, although officially part of British North America, British Columbia was a wilderness territory, effectively run by the Hudson’s Bay Company who controlled the fur trade throughout the Pacific North-west. The area was largely unsettled and the sparse population was made up primarily of aboriginal people, and a few hundred British settlers […] Barbara J Starmans No responses 11 min read February 28, 2016
  • Early Motion Pictures The motion picture industry was in its infancy when my grandfather started working for General Film in Montreal. Although very new, dedicated movie theatres were extremely popular in Montreal and in the early twentieth century, several theatres had opened in Montreal including the Ouimet in 1906 and the Nationoscope in 1907. By 1911, when John Arthur Bond went to […] Barbara J Starmans No responses 9 min read February 21, 2016
  • Snow, Snow and More Snow On Monday, December 11, 1944, the forecast for Toronto, Ontario was for fresh to strong winds with some snow Monday and Tuesday, probably part sleet, but by noon on Tuesday, December 12, it was clear that forecasters had missed the mark. Twenty-one inches of snow-covered the ground in Toronto by lunchtime on Tuesday and still it […] Barbara J Starmans 2 responses 9 min read February 14, 2016
  • Five Babies Cry All Night On Sunday night, May 27, 1934 at a rural home midway between the towns of Corbeil and Callander in northern Ontario, Donalda Legros and Mary Jeanne Lebelle were attending twenty-six year-old Elzire Dionne who had gone into premature labour with this, her seventh pregnancy. The midwives, concerned about Elzire’s condition and the premature delivery, had summon local physician Dr. Allan Roy Dafoe in the pre-dawn hours […] Barbara J Starmans One response 12 min read February 7, 2016