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Loss of the Dryad

The Dryad, from Liverpool to St. Jago de Cuba, was totally wrecked on the 10th November on a reef of rocks, about 20 miles east of Cape Cruz.

Globe – Saturday 28 December 1839

The Dryad’s principal owner was Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace, aged 29, a seaman. He had purchased a 75% share of the 204 ton brig Dryad from Mr. Gillespie in December 1837 for £1200, of which £1060 was paid in cash, the remainder by a bill. Shortly after the purchase, the ship was put into dry dock and was newly coppered and repaired at a cost of £600, bringing the estimated value of the ship to about £2200. The remaining 25% was owned by the firm of Howden and Co, through the partnership of Alexander Howden and Peter Ainsley.

In July 1839, the Dryad was chartered to Messrs. Zulueta and Co., merchants, for a voyage from Liverpool to Santa Cruz. The cost of the charter was £300. The ship was to be captained by Edmund Loose, a master mariner hired by Michael Wallace for the journey.

The contracts for the cargo carried by the Dryad on her journey to Cuba and the insurance on them were arranged by Michael’s brother, Patrick Maxwell Stewart Wallace, a merchant. He was assisted with these arrangements by James Stott, a ship-broker in his employ.

They Dryad, however, did not complete the journey. She was wrecked on a reef of rocks only 20 miles short of her destination on 10 November 1839.

A full year after the sinking of the Dryad, certain irregularities regarding the insurance claims against the loss of the ship and it’s cargo were brought to light.

The Arrests

Patrick Maxwell Stewart Wallace and James Stott

At the end of November 1840 in a crowed Justice Room of the Mansion House, Patrick Maxwell Stewart Wallace and James Stott were charged by Mr. Clarkson, who represented the governors of several insurance companies, with undisclosed offences relating to insurance fraud. The insurance companies included General Maritime Assurance Company, the Neptune Assurance Company, the Mutual Indemnity Alliance Assurance Company and the Marine Assurance Company. With sufficient evidence presented, Wallace and Stott were denied bail and held over for trial by the Lord Mayor.

Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace

Meanwhile, after hearing of his brother’s arrest, Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace suddenly discharged his servant, packed up every movable belonging, and deserted his house in Tredegar Square.

Desertion of a Dwelling with nearly Five Hundred Pounds worth of Furniture in it. – On Monday last, a policeman belonging to the K division, finding the door of one of the large houses in Tredegar-square, Mile-end, open , he knocked several times, and not receiving answer, entered, and found that though furnished with every appearance of domestic comfort, there was not a soul to be found it, and that it had been completely deserted. Information of the circumstance was forwarded to the Bow station-house, and by the direction of Mr. Young, the superintendent of the K division of police, it has been since safely guarded by his constables, who relieve one another. The house, appears, had been occupied a Captain VV and his family, and there are various reports in the neighbourhood as to the cause of their deserting it in so hurried a manner that even massive writing desk, with sundry papers and private memorandums, together with some wine in decanters, and glasses were left upon the parlour-table, and even the wearing apparel does not appear to have been disturbed. The rumour that Captain W has been concerned with the parties who have been recently been examined at the Mansion-house, on a charge of robbing various Insurance Companies by sinking a vessel, and that, fearful the consequences, he, with his family, made his escape from the neighbourhood, without removing a single article of furniture from the house. Mr. Hemmock, of Mile-end who is agent to the landlord of the house, and who states that no rent will be due until after Christmas, has given directions to the police remain in it. and take every care of the furniture until some arrangement is made about it.

Nottingham Review and General Advertiser for the Midland Counties – Friday 18 December 1840

Michael was later arrested in an obscure cottage on the sea shore in Lancashire.

Monday, 28 December 1840, Michael Shaw Stuart Wallace, brother to the Wallace in custody with Stott on a charge of defrauding several Insurance Companies of large amounts by destroying the ship Dryad, has been traced and apprehended at Lancaster, charged with being implicated in the felony. 

Salisbury and Winchester Journal – Monday 28 December 1840

Janet and Catherine Wallace

Prior to Michael Wallace’s capture, his sisters Janet Wallace and Catherine Wallace were taken into custody on charges of conspiracy in the destruction of the Dryad.

On the day of Patrick Wallace’s arrest, bank stock which was in the names of Janet and Catherine and their brother Michael Wallace had been sold and the proceeds sent to yet another sister, Euphemia Wallace in Edinburgh. The bank stock had been bought with the proceeds of the insurance money collected on the loss of the Dryad.

They were further accused of aiding and abetting the escape of Michael Wallace on the evening that he fled London.

Their father, Andrew Wallace, went immediately to their defense, and posted bail of £500 each on their behalf.

Mary Wallace

A warrant was issued for the arrest of Mary Wallace, the wife of Michael Wallace, who had absconded on the same night as her husband. A reward was offered for her capture.

The Trial

On Monday, 7 December 1840, the trial of James Stott and Patrick Maxwell Stewart Wallace commenced in the Justice Room at the Mansion House. 1Old Bailey Proceedings Online www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 30 December 2018, March 1841, trial of PATRICK MAXWELL STEWART WALLACE MICHAEL SHAW STEWART WALLACE t18410301-836.

The trial of the Wallace brothers garnered considerable interest amongst those involved in shipping and was widely reported. Not only was there a large sum of money involved in the Dryad fraud, but the Wallace brothers were the sons of Andrew Wallace, a respected merchant of Leith who had ties to the family of Sir Michael Shaw Stewart, 6th Baronet.

The two brothers, Michael and Patrick Wallace, who have been committed to Newgate, charged with feloniously losing the ship Dryad, are the sons of Andrew Wallace, long known as respectable store-keeper in Leith: he was for many years the faithful servant of Sir Michael Shaw Stewart, father of the late Baronet; and from gratitude to his respected master, named his three sons after the family of Ardgowan : this will account for such names being associated with the late criminal proceedings against the Wallaces.

Newcastle Journal – Saturday 20 February 1841

The first witness was called

George Herring

George Herring testified that he acted in his capacity as a ship-broker to arrange a charter party for Messrs. Zulueta and Co. with the owners of the ship Dryad. He produced the document, bearing the signatures of the Zulueta men and Michael Wallace.

The charter-party was here read, dated 25th July, 1839, by which it was agreed between M. S. Wallace and the owners of the Dryad, (204 tons,) and Zulueta and Co., of London, that the said vessel should be exclusively chartered to Zulueta and Co., for the sum of £300 to proceed from Liverpool to Santa Cruz, in Cuba, subject to the approbation of the firm of Zulueta, at Liverpool, by return of post.

Old Bailey Court Transcripts

Alexander Howden

The next witness, Alexander Howden, told how he and his partner Peter Ainslie had received a directive from co-owner Michael Wallace to insure the Dryad for £2200 for the voyage to Santa Cruz in Cuba and the return voyage to Liverpool. The policy was ultimately written for £2000 with the Marine Insurance Company and was dated 10 August 1839. Howden stated that they also insured the ship’s cargo for £300 with Lloyd’s of London.

Samuel Bickley

An insurance broker with Lloyd’s of London, Samuel Bickley produced a copy of the insurance policy and stated that the amount of £300 was paid in full on 10 January 1840 after the loss of the Dryad for the cargo which was described as hardware, 1000 bags of salt and other things, value together, £3000.

Richard James Sheppard

Representing the Alliance Marine Insurance Company, Sheppard produced another policy for cargo on the Dryad, this one written for £715. The policy was taken out on 24 August 1839 and was for goods described as six cases of flannel, two cases of cloth, two cases of printed cotton. It was signed by Mr. Stott as the insurance broker for the Dryad and was paid in full to Mr. Stott accordingly after the loss of the Dryad. The amount, less a commission, was paid to Patrick Wallace.

James Gray

Gray, the superintendent of the underwriting department of the General Maritime Insurance Company produced yet another policy for £1264, 12s, signed by three of the directors which described the cargo of the Dryad as 39 tierces of beef, 52 barrels of pork, 38 firkins of butter, 35 crates of earthenware, 7 cases of cotton prints, 5 bales of blankets. This policy was also taken out by Mr. Stott and was paid to him at a rate of 80 percent on receipt of the bill of lading with the balance being paid after receipt of a letter of indemnity.

The amount paid to James Stott on the General Maritime policy was paid to Patrick Wallace on 10 October 1840, less the commission that Stott was owed for his services.

James Stott

James Stott testified to having taken out the policies with Alliance Marine and General Maritime but said that Patrick Wallace had given him the following explanation. He said that although the ship was chartered by Messrs. Zulueta and Co., they had not filled up the ship and as a result he and his brother had put their own freight in the left over space. He did not wish this known to the Zuluetas or he was afraid that they would charge them for the freight.

Stott also testified at length about several conversations he had with Patrick Wallace regarding the loss of the ship and the whereabouts of Captain Loose. He related several such conversations during which Patrick alluded to the sinking of the Dryad not being an accident, but said he took them as a joke. He told the court that Patrick told him that Captain Loose

…was a very clever fellow and deserved all he had got… he had done the Dryad’s job very clean…

James Stott’s testimony

Stott told the court that at one time after the sinking of the Dryad, he told Patrick Wallace that he had heard of ships being sent out to be lost, and asked him if the Dryad was one of those. He said that Patrick had become indignant and had threatened to kick him out of the house for the suggestion.

Stott Exhonerated

In early January 1841, James Stott was cleared of any involvement in the fraud after giving testimony as a witness in the trial of the Wallace brothers.

Peter Kelly

Peter Kelly was called to the stand as the clerk to Zulueta and Co. He testified that he had worked to get goods to fill up the vessel up until the time of sailing. He testified that in his estimation, there was no way that the Wallace goods were put onto the ship before she sailed.

it would talk a day, or a day and a half to put eighty-eight crates of earthenware on board, according to the circumstances – it would take a day at least of eight or nine working hours – it would require the use of tackle to get such goods on board, and a good many hands – it would take perhaps two or three hours to get provisions, such as butter, pork and beef, on board – I had an opportunity of seeing the state of the hold within two or three days before she sailed – I could see the hold from the main hatchway, without going down into it.

Peter Kelly’s testimony

Alfred John Tate

The master of the Bencoolen, bound for Cape Tayti on 23 October 1839 testified that he observed a brig to the east of his location that turned out to be the Dryad, Captain Loose. He saw her east of his ship headed for the reef called the Silver Bank. He waited to see if the ship would alter course but she did not and so he fired a gun in warning of the danger. When the Dryad did not alter course, he sent the pilot to board her and only then did the Dryad steer away from the Silver Bank.

Later, on seeing Captain Loose on shore, he saw the rudder of the Dryad had unshipped and a jury rudder was in it’s place. The Dryad remained in port about a fortnight and underwent some repairs.

While the repairs were underway, a mate from the Dryad by the name of Maxwell applied to Tate for a berth.

Ronald Maxwell

Maxwell sailed with Captain Loose on the Dryad on 4 September 1839 on her voyage to Santa Cruz. He testified that he was in the hold on the day she sailed and said that they took on a few cases of hardware and a few kegs of paint but no other cargo. One third of the hold remained empty.

Maxwell found that the larboard pump was choked and tried to clear it but was not able to. He told the captain, but he did not remark. When they made land in the West Indies at Virgin Gorda, breakers ahead indicated that there was a reef. Maxwell went to tell Captain Loose and told Shultz, the man at the wheel, to put the helm down and let the ship come around to keep her off the breakers. Captain Loose then took the wheel himself and hove the helm up again to direct the ship back at the breakers.

Only when the crew complained and threatened to take control of the ship did the Captain put the helm down again and the ship came around.

Later, as they approached the Silver Keys, Maxwell pointed out a rock but the Captain said he could not see it. One of the crew called

Rocks under her fore-foot!

The ship stuck on the rocks and the Captain cried

We are all lost

But after fifteen to twenty minutes, the ship drifted off the rocks with no perceptible damage.

Not long after, the Captain tried again to run the ship onto the breakers but was warned off by the Alfred Tate, the captain of the Bencoolen. It was then that Maxwell decided to leave the Dryad and take a berth with the Bencoolen.

It was as well he did since the Dryad was wrecked shortly afterwards about 20 miles east of Santa Cruz.

The Dryad was wrecked about 20 miles east of Santa Cruz

Captain Edmond Loose

Before he could testify, Captain Edmund Loose died aboard the ship Premier on the voyage home from Cuba. His mother inherited his entire estate, sworn to be under £200.

Convicted

Over the course of the trial, it had been proven beyond doubt that insurance policies had been been taken out and collected on for goods that were never aboard the Dryad. Further, it seem obvious that Patrick and Michael Wallace had conspired with Captain Loose to wreck the ship Dryad so that the insurance on the ship could be collected as well. In the end, both Patrick and Michael Wallace confessed.

Confessions

Statement by Patrick Maxwell Stewart Wallace

I, Patrick Wallace, carried on business in the ale and bristle trade at the residence of my father, No. 18, Cooper’s-row, Crutched Friars, from whom I rented my counting-house. About the month of August 1839, the Dryad was lying at Liverpool, chartered by Zulueta and Co., to proceed on a voyage to Santa Cruz in Cuba. My brother Michael, who held three-fourths of that vessel, came up to London from Liverpool, and one day while walking with me in America square, in the Mincries, said to me,

Patrick, if you promise to tell nobody, I will let you know a secret of much importance

Michael Wallace

I said that I would not mention it, when he told me that he and Captain Loose had agreed together that the Dryad should be cast away on her voyage out to Cuba, and that if I would insure a lot of goods in London, I should have £500 for my share after all the money was paid. I agreed to this proposal, in consequence of which my brother Michael again went down to Liverpool. He shortly afterwards returned to London, came into my counting house, and presented to me six blank bills of lading, ail signed in the genuine handwriting of Captain Loose, and I then filled up two of them {stamped) with goods, one to the amount of £715, and the other to the amount of £698.

Patrick Wallace then went on to describe receiving the report of the sinking of the Dryad, the various fraudulent insurance claims, the death of Captain Loose and the discovery of the papers he carried with him on his journey home. Those papers detailed the salvage operation that took place after the Dryad sank and gave an account of all of the cargo saved which totaled £1500 since all but the salt was recovered. Those papers would have been damning had they come to light since their details were proof that much of the insured cargo had never been aboard the Dryad in the first place.

Statement by Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace

I purchased three-fourths of the Dryad about December 1837 for £1200, £1060 of which was paid in cash, and the remainder by a bill. I went as master of the Dryad to Rio Janeiro, and returned in her to London. Loose was the master at the time. Next voyage Loose went as master, with my instructions to proceed to Rio, and take the berth for London. The vessel was consigned to a person at Rio, who had similar instructions from me, but he deviated from those instructions, and sent the vessel to the Cape Verd Islands for sale, and drew upon me for £315. When I received this intelligence, my friends advised me to go out to Rio and look after my property. I went out to Rio in the barque Blair from Liverpool and upon my arrival found the vessel a complete wreck, and was angry with the master for his conduct, but he threw the blame upon others.

It was then that Michael and Captain Loose came up with the scheme to cast away the Dryad and collect on insurance. Loose was to have £250 for his part in the scheme.

Accounting of Michael’s Proceeds from the Fraud

British Indemnity Company £414
Howden and Ainsley£1,590
Seldon and Johnson£1,284
Liverpool Ocean Company £458
Goods, Lyndall and Hall £667
Cash from my brother, being a balance from Alliance Company £215
£4,628

Michael went on to say that he had paid off his sister’s mortgage for the Lucy and the Dryad at a cost of £1,100 and expended much of the rest on goods and expenses. He had only £462 of the money remaining.

Up to the latter end of the year 1836 I was a steady, hard-working fellow. At that time I commanded the Delta, and unfortunately went into Liverpool with a cargo from Brazil, and there was introduced into the family of —-, Esq., whose foundation is well know to have been buying old ships and casting them away. I was encouraged by him and Mrs. —- to seek their daughter, and I must confess that ambition tempted me to forget my old playmate and my present unfortunately wife, so far, that I did so, and I believe I would have done anything to have gained Miss —‘s affections.

Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace, Newgate, 28 March 1841.

Insurance Fraud

It is possible that this was not the first time that the Wallace family had cast away a ship for the insurance profits.

The Delta, Wallace, from London and Teneriffe, to Jamaica, was lost on Berberda the 28th ult. – crew saved.

Morning Post – Wednesday 14 June 1837

A true bill against the Michael Wallace was taken out for destroying the Delta in 1837 but a trial was deemed unnecessary.

An organized system of fraud has for years been exercised both against the insurance-offices and the individual underwriters, and that by the parties who destroyed the Dryad. At the sessions in which the late trial took place, a true bill was also found against the elder Wallace for destroying the Delta in the year 1837, although it was not found necessary to proceed to trial. This would show that the frauds were part of a system, and that the affair of the Dryad is not an isolated case; but with respect to any vessel or vessels at present out, an inclination is shown amount parties engage in inquiries to act with great caution in trusting to the confessions of convicted felons.

Evening Mail – Wednesday 31 March 1841

After the Dryad case concluded, authorities began to investigate the claims made by Michael Wallace regarding the Liverpool ship owner, his previous losses and a ship currently at sea. He alleged that the ship York, currently at sea under the command of Captain James Legg, was to be lost. The Captain, on reaching Calcutta heard of these reports and addressed the following letter to Lloyd’s of London:

Calcutta, Aug. 15, 1841. Sir — The peculiar circumstances under which I am placed, I trust, will be a sufficient excuse for the liberty I take in thus addressing you. ” I cannot picture to you my astonishment on my arrival at Calcutta at hearing of the vile reports which had gone the rounds of the newspapers, and which, doubtless, came under your observation, concerning the ship York, and coupling my name (as commander) with the most villainous plot on record. It goes on to say that arrangements had been made for the willful destruction of this ship. How such a diabolical report could have originated I know not, and most heartily do I pray that the vile projectors of such unfounded slander may be dragged to justice and the punishment they deserve. You must be well aware, Sir. that if my innocence be not clearly proved beyond doubt, this villainous calumny is calculated to blast my prospects through life ; for who would entrust me with a valuable property whilst such a stigma remains on my character ? I here declare (that which eventually must be proved) that I do not know of the most trivial circumstance that could have given rise to the slightest shadow of suspicion of such a plot as I have been charged with, and do therefore, during ray absence from England, rely solely on my perfect innocence, which I feel confident will give me back my hitherto untarnished reputation, which some vile wretch has endeavoured to wrench from me. ” I beg you will lay this before your honourable committee, and should there be any circumstance unexplained relative to this very curious matter, I shall be glad on my arrival in England to expose to the public view my every transaction, which, I feel convinced, will clearly prove to the world how basely I have been calumniated. I pray you to give this publicity in one or more of the public journals I ask it as an act of justice — of humanity ; for you must be aware that at such a distance from England this is the only means I have of vindicating my injured name. — I am, Sir your obedient servant, ” James Legg, ” Commander of the ship York. ” P.S. I shall sail from this port for London about the 25th of September, 1841.”

Morning Post – Saturday 16 October 1841

James Legg arrived in London as planned but in 1847, the Merchant Vessel Romeo under his command went missing on a trip from Hong Kong to London, leaving China on 13 July 1847 but never arriving in London. It was assumed to have sunk and the crew drowned.

Transportation

Patrick Maxwell Stewart Wallace and Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace were convicted on 1 March 1841 at the Old Bailey in London and sentenced to be transported for life. The Wallace brothers were received aboard the Fortitude in Chatham on 1 April 1841 to await the journey to Van Diemens Land. 2Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece: 11

The Wallace Family

Andrew Wallace and Euphemia Hardie

Andrew Wallace, former merchant of Leith, died on 9 January 1848 at Windsor-terrace, City Road, London of paralysis, aged 70. 3Liverpool Mail – Saturday 15 January 1848

Janet Wallace

Janet Wallace was born 29 June 1801 and baptised on 9 July the same year at South Leith Midlothian, Scotland. 4FHL Film Number 1067778, Reference 2:18RPVR3 , Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Catherine Wallace

Catherine Wallace was baptised on 13 September 1804 in South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland.
5FHL Film Number 1067778, Reference 2:18RR5T5 , Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

She went to live with her brother Houston, settling near Barnstaple in Devon where she died at the age of 80 in late 1884.

Euphemia Wallace

Euphemia Wallace, named for her mother, was born on 26 December 1806 and baptised on 18 January 1807 in South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland. 6FHL Film Number 1067779, Reference
2:18RT4RT, Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace

Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace was born about 1812 in South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland
to parents Euphemia Hardie and Andrew Wallace.

At 5 foot 5-1/4 inches, Michael was a small man. His complexion was fair and he had an oval face with a somewhat large nose, mouth and chin. His hair was brown but his whiskers and eyebrows were black.

He married Mary Stewart on 1 April 1840 in Inverness, Inverness, Scotland, not long after the loss of the Dryad. 7FHL Film 990980, Original data: Scotland, Marriages, 1561-1910. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013.

When the Dryad was lost, Michael was living in Tredegar Square in Mile-end and carried on his business at 18 Cooper’s Row, Crutched Friars.

After being convicted of the felony of inciting a person to destroy a ship at the Central Criminal Court on 1 March 1841, Michael Wallace was sentenced to be transported for life to Van Dieman’s Land. He was transferred to the Hulk Ship Fortitude moored at Chatham on 1 April 1841. Michael Wallace, along with his brother Patrick was transported aboard the Westmoreland, leaving London on 15 May 1841 and arriving in Hobart Town on 12 September.

After arriving in Van Dieman’s Land, Michael Shaw Stewart Wallace worked as a hospital clerk and was said to have exhibited exceptionally good conduct. He died in New Hospital in Norfolk on 2 May 1845.

Houston Stuart Wallace

Houston Stuart Wallace was born 22 November 1813 and baptised 13 December 1813. 8FHL Film Number 1067779, Reference 2:18RX81D, Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

He received his Master’s Certificate on 17 February 1859 and married Elizabeth Thomson on 9 October 1867 in Edinburgh.

By 1871, Houston Wallace had retired from the sea and was living with his wife Elizabeth and sister Catherine in Leyton, Essex at Lurry Cottage. By 1881, they had moved to Bishops Tawton in Devon.

Houston Stuart Wallace died 18 March 1883 at 2 Prospect Place in Newport in the parish of Bishop’s Tawton near Barnstaple in the County of Devon. He was survived by his wife Elizabeth who inherited his personal estate of £1273, 2s and 6d.

Patrick Maxwell Stewart Wallace

Patrick Maxwell Stewart Wallace, a merchant, was born 7 September 1815. He was baptized on 25 October 1815 in South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland. 9FHL Film Number 1067779, Reference 2:18RZ3GC, Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Patrick was not very tall, only 5 feet, 5-3/4 inches in his stocking feet. His complexion was fair, his hair brown and his whiskers dark. His eyes were a dark hazel.

In 1839, he lived at 40 Windsor Terrace, City Road and carried on business at 18 Cooper’s Row, Crutched Friars. Patrick was an importer of bristles and other Russian produce, and he also dealt in ale and porter like his father before him.

After being convicted of the felony of inciting a person to destroy a ship at the Central Criminal Court on 1 March 1841, Patrick Wallace was sentenced to be transported for life to Van Dieman’s Land. He was transferred to the Hulk Ship Fortitude moored at Chatham on 1 April 1841. Patrick Wallace, along with his brother Michael, was transported aboard the Westmoreland, leaving London on 15 May 1841 and arriving in Hobart Town on 12 September.

In July 1847, Patrick Wallace was granted a conditional pardon, having shown good conduct during his time in the colony. It is possible that he married Janet Stephen in Melbourne shortly afterwards. Janet died at the age of 27 at Latrobe street in Melbourne on 7 October 1851.

Patrick then married Margaret Robson in 1852 in Melbourne and he died 24 May 1861 in Queensland at the age of 45.

On the 24th instant, at Brunswick-street, Fortitude, Valley, Mr. P. M. S. Wallace, aged 45.

The Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1861 – 1864) Mon 27 May 1861 Page 2 Family Notices

His wife Margaret died 29 January 1870, aged 48 years.

WALLACE.—On the 29th January, at Brisbane, Margaret, relict of the late P. M. S. Wallace, of Edinburgh, aged 48 years.

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 – 1933) Sat 29 Jan 1870 Page 4 Family Notices

References   [ + ]

1.Old Bailey Proceedings Online www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 30 December 2018, March 1841, trial of PATRICK MAXWELL STEWART WALLACE MICHAEL SHAW STEWART WALLACE t18410301-836.
2.Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece: 11
3.Liverpool Mail – Saturday 15 January 1848
4.FHL Film Number 1067778, Reference 2:18RPVR3 , Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
5.FHL Film Number 1067778, Reference 2:18RR5T5 , Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
6.FHL Film Number 1067779, Reference
2:18RT4RT, Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
7.FHL Film 990980, Original data: Scotland, Marriages, 1561-1910. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013.
8.FHL Film Number 1067779, Reference 2:18RX81D, Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
9.FHL Film Number 1067779, Reference 2:18RZ3GC, Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
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